Nissan Gtr 2009 Detail Specification Video Reviews


From $76,840
Face-distorting acceleration, world-class handling, exceptionally easy to drive, low MSRP.

No manual-transmission option, hefty curb weight, polarizing exterior design.

The long-awaited 2009 Nissan GT-R debuts, replete with a twin-turbocharged V6 engine, all-wheel drive and legendary Skyline heritage.

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Technically, the 2009 Nissan GT-R isn’t a Skyline — that distinction now belongs to what we know as the Infiniti G series, which is marketed as the Nissan Skyline in Japan. But don’t let the official nomenclature fool you. From its familiar twin-turbocharged engine and all-wheel-drive layout to its telltale circular taillights, there’s no mistaking the new Nissan for anything but a modern-day Skyline GT-R.

The big deal for Americans is that the 2009 GT-R marks the first time this legendary performance car will be officially sold stateside. We also happen to be getting the most ambitious version yet. The great-granddaddy of the new GT-R, the “Godzilla” R32 Skyline GT-R produced from 1989-’93, was designed to equal the performance of the iconic Porsche 959. Nissan’s benchmark for the 2009 GT-R? The mighty Porsche 997-series 911 Turbo.

That’s a tall order under any circumstances, but Nissan’s President and CEO, Carlos Ghosn, sent the degree of difficulty skyrocketing when he agreed to green-light the GT-R project on two conditions: first, the base price had to be about $70,000; and second, the car had to be profitable, i.e., not merely an image-boosting “halo car” that would be sold at a loss. Improbably, the GT-R has succeeded on all counts. Ghosn’s conditions have been met, and we can confirm that the 2009 Nissan GT-R is indeed a match for its Bavarian benchmark at the track. Never before has such stratospheric factory performance been available at such a reasonable price; in fact, you’d have to look long and hard to match the GT-R’s performance at any price.

How does the GT-R do it? As far as that bargain-basement price tag is concerned, we’d put it down to a mixture of modern mass-production techniques and magic. Performance-wise, the gnarly Nissan has a long list of co-conspirators to thank, among them a 473-horsepower twin-turbocharged V6, a thoroughly revised version of the previous GT-R’s ATTESA ET-S all-wheel-drive system, a trick suspension with adjustable dampers and a dual-clutch transmission that ranks right up there with the best in the business.

Credit also goes to the GT-R’s all-new PM (“Premium Midship”) chassis, as distinguished from the FM platform that underpins the 350Z and the Infiniti G35. The GT-R’s 53/47 weight distribution (50/50 under full acceleration, Nissan says) is due in part to the PM chassis’ rear-mounted transmission, unusual in any case for a front-engine design — only the Corvette and a few other high-end performance cars have one — but unprecedented for one with all-wheel drive. What’s more, to guard against inconsistencies from one GT-R to the next, the car’s suspension and body are assembled on a jig, racecar style. The result is an honest-to-goodness supercar — except for the bottom line.