Mercedes-Benz CL-Class

The Mercedes-Benz CL-Class manufacture by Mercedes-Benz automobile company. Read more to view more detail and video reviews. Please feel free to comments and give rating to help others


The Mercedes-Benz CL-Class is a full-sized grand tourer produced by the German automaker Mercedes-Benz, which stands for Comfort Leicht in German, or Comfort Light in English.

Originally derived from the SL-Class roadster, it has since been based on the S-Class sedan. Known at first as the SEC and later S coupe, it was spun off into its own line and current name in 1998. The CL continues to follow the same development cycle as the S, though riding on a slightly shorter wheelbase and offering smaller selection of engines, mostly tending towards the high-powered of the range.

The closest competitor was the now-discontinued BMW 8 Series coupe. However, while the performance-oriented 8 series had a cramped 2+2 seating arrangement, the rear passenger volume of the CL and its previous incarnations is large enough to classify them as 2-door sedans by the SAE, making the CL one of the few full-sized coupes that offer a combination of engine power and luxury accommodation.[1]

The present generation of the CL-Class, or C216, is currently available in four models: CL500 4Matic (CL550 4Matic in America), CL600, CL63 AMG and CL65 AMG. The 2009 price ranges from $108,775 to $204,575. The most powerful model of the CL is the most expensive Mercedes-branded vehicle (with the exception of the SLR and the S Class Pullman), slightly edging out its equivalent in the flagship S-Class.

The CL-class can most directly trace its roots back to the W126-chassis SEC-class of 1981-1991. The SEC was itself a replacement for the R107 series SLC cars, which were essentially lengthened SL roadsters with a fixed roof and rear seat. The W126 SEC was more directly related to the S-Class sedans. The first generation SEC-Class came in four models: 380 SEC, 420 SEC, 500 SEC and 560 SEC. Like all subsequent models, the rear passenger volume of the SEC coupes was large enough to classify them as 2-door sedans by the SAE.