Ford Mustang 2010 Detail Specification Video Reviews


From $20,995
Powerful acceleration and great V8 soundtrack in GT trim, available Ford Sync system, good performance bang for the buck with the V8.

Weak and outdated V6, unimpressive fuel economy all around.

The 2010 Ford Mustang puts a bounce in its gallop with rejuvenated styling inside and out. It also boasts larger wheels, standard stability control and more power for the V8-powered GT model. Handling has been improved across the board, and the GT benefits from suspension tuning from last year’s discontinued Bullitt edition. An optional GT TrackPack further sharpens the Mustang GT’s suspension for track duty. Additionally, Ford’s voice-activated Sync multimedia integration system is now available for the Mustang.

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From the driver’s perspective, the 2010 Ford Mustang is a tale of two engines. The base Mustang with its aged V6 is a truck in sport-coupe clothing, a debatable 20-dollar upgrade at the Hertz counter. The Mustang V8, on the other hand, is a barrel-chested beast that lives to make stoplight mincemeat of similarly priced import sport coupes. But even the base Mustang V6 benefits from the numerous exterior and interior styling updates for 2010, and new optional features like Ford Sync are undeniably alluring. On this view, the 2010 Ford Mustang actually offers something for everyone: a rowdy V8-powered performance car for enthusiasts and a distinctively styled six-cylinder coupe for those whose tire-squealing days are behind them.

Let’s start with the Mustang GT, a rambunctious purveyor of burbling exhaust pipes and smoking tires that can nonetheless tackle a twisting mountain road with admirable poise. Its non-independent rear suspension might not be the most technologically advanced design on the planet, but the GT makes up for it with a combination of a sweet 4.6-liter V8 and shrewd suspension tuning, both of which have benefited from a raid on the discontinued Mustang Bullitt’s parts bin. The V8 gains 15 horsepower and 5 pound-feet of torque this year, thanks in large part to the Bullitt’s cold-air induction system, and the springs and shocks have also been dialed up to Bullitt levels of stiffness. For those who aren’t sufficiently impressed by the GT’s improvements, the TrackPack option package tightens up the suspension even further.

The Mustang V6, on the other hand, is saddled with an ancient V6 that’s intimately related to the venerable Ford Ranger pickup’s optional 4.0-liter power plant. It continues to sell well because of its eye-catching retro styling and considerably lower cost, but in our opinion, there are simply better choices. The Mustang V6’s base price makes us think of numerous other desirable sporty cars we’d rather spend that money on — the Honda Civic Si and Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T, to name a couple. However, we will confess that the Mustang V6 convertible would be our rental ragtop of choice, easily beating out the monumentally boring Chrysler Sebring.

Notwithstanding the Mustang V6’s mediocrity, the V8-powered GT is certainly an enticing proposition. It’s more nimble than the Dodge Challenger, and we anticipate that the Chevrolet Camaro will cost substantially more when equipped with a V8, even if it does end up being a better all-around car than the Mustang. One might also consider the Hyundai Genesis Coupe V6 and the Nissan 370Z, though neither can match the Mustang’s melodious V8. All said, the Mustang V6 may be the dog of this show, but the GT is a thoroughbred pony that offers one of the best sub-$30,000 rides in the business.