Daewoo Magnus

The Daewoo Magnus manufacture by Daewoo automobile company. Read more to view more detail and video reviews. Please feel free to comments and give rating to help others


The Daewoo Magnus is a mid-size sedan developed and manufactured by Daewoo Motors until its purchase by General Motors, and now built for GM Daewoo Auto & Technology (GMDAT) by Daewoo Incheon Motor Company at its Bupyeong facility in South Korea. GM Daewoo and other GM divisions, as well as GMDAT stake holder Suzuki, have been marketing this car under different badges in various countries. The car is also known under its internal Daewoo designation of V200. The Project Manager was Dr. W.J Lee.

The V200 is a further development of the Daewoo Leganza (model V100), based on a stretched platform of that model. Launched in 2000, it was sold alongside the Leganza in Korea until the end of V100’s production in 2002, when it also superseded it in export markets. The V200 itself has been given an extensive facelift for 2006, which resulted in the model known as V250, or Daewoo Tosca in Korea. The V250 will completely supersede all versions of the V200 during 2006.

The Evanda comes equipped with the Daewoo-developed XK6 inline-6 engine (DOHC 24V, 155 hp (116 kW) at 5800 rpm, 177 lb·ft (240 N·m) of torque at 4000 rpm – Canadian specification) or a Holden-built 2.0L E-TEC II Inline-4 (DOHC 16V) carried over from the Leganza. ItalDesign of Italy was responsible for the styling and design of both the Leganza and Magnus. However, the upcoming V250 was styled in Korea by GM Daewoo.

The V200 was marketed as Daewoo Evanda in Western Europe, and Chevrolet Evanda in many Eastern European countries where GM did not use the Daewoo brand, as locally-manufactured versions of old Daewoo models were still sold under that marque. The Evanda replaced the Leganza, and also the Chevrolet Alero. Later, in 2004, the entire Daewoo brand was replaced by Chevrolet in all Europe, with models renamed accordingly.

The Evanda was also badge-engineered as the Suzuki Verona in the United States and Canada, and Chevrolet Epica in other markets including China and Arabia. However, Suzuki announced it would drop the Verona after the 2006 model year due to poor sales.[1]