Chevrolet Monte Carlo

The Chevrolet Monte Carlo manufacture by Chevrolet automobile company. Read more to view more detail and video reviews. Please feel free to comments and give rating to help others


The Chevrolet Monte Carlo was an American-made automobile. Originally introduced by Chevrolet for the 1970 model year (as competition with the Ford Thunderbird), it has gone through six generations as of 2007. All Monte Carlos to date have been two-door personal luxury coupes, closely based on a contemporary mid-sized sedan.

The Monte Carlo was originally created by Scott Butler as Chevrolet’s counterpart to the new G-body Pontiac Grand Prix, which had been introduced to great success for 1969. For the 1968 model year, GM had instituted a split-wheelbase policy for its A-body intermediate cars: 112 in (2845 mm) for two-door models, 116 in (2946 mm) for sedans and station wagons. The Grand Prix was a two-door coupe riding a special 118 in (2997 mm) version of the A-platform (known as the “G-body “). Rather than add the extra length within the body to increase passenger space (as was customary on sedans) the G-body (also known as the A-body Special) spliced the extra length between the firewall and the front wheels, creating an unusually long hood. The look was very successful, and the new Grand Prix greatly outsold its larger, B-body predecessor despite higher prices.

The Monte Carlo was the brainchild of Elliot M. (Pete) Estes, general manager of Chevrolet, and Chevrolet’s chief stylist, Dave Holls. They modeled the styling on the contemporary Cadillac Eldorado, although much of the body and structure were shared with the Chevrolet Chevelle (firewall, windshield, decklid, and rear window were the same), adding new front end sheetmetal, wider C-pillars, and new rear fenders. Bulges were added to the fenders to create a more muscular appearance. The Monte Carlo also had the then-fashionable concealed windshield wipers.

A mid-1990s article in Chevrolet High Performance stated that the first generation Monte Carlo was known to Chevrolet brass under the working name Concours (a usual practice where all Chevrolet models started with a “C”). At one point, the proposal called for a formal coupe, sedan, and convertible. It has been noted that the sedan resembled a full-size Oldsmobile 98 prior to the use of the GM G platform with at least one photo showing the pull-up door handles that would be introduced on the 1970 1/2 Camaro and 1971 full-sized Chevys, but not appear on Monte Carlos until the second-generation model debuted in 1973.

Though the Monte Carlo was developed at Chevrolet under the leadership of Pete Estes, it was formally introduced in September, 1969 by John Z. DeLorean, who succeeded Estes as Chevrolet’s general manager earlier in the year after previously heading the Pontiac division, where he led the development of the similar-bodied 1969 Grand Prix introduced the previous model year.