BMW 8 Series

The BMW 8 Series manufacture by BMW automobile company. Read more to view more detail and video reviews. Please feel free to comments and give rating to help others


The BMW 8 Series (chassis code BMW E31) is a V8 or V12-engined 2-door 2+2 coupe built by BMW from 1989 to 1999.

While it did supplant the original E24 based 6 Series in 1991, a common misconception is that the 8 Series was developed as a successor. However, it was actually an entirely new class aimed at a different market, with a substantially higher price point and better performance than the 6 series. The 8 Series was designed as a direct competitor to the upcoming Mercedes-Benz SL-Class and S-Class coupes (later renamed the CL-Class). While it has less rear passenger volume than the CL which is considered a two-door sedan, the 8 Series could accommodate two passengers in the rear, while the SL roadster is a two-seater.

The BMW 8 Series was BMW’s flagship car while in production. A new vehicle cost around US$100,000 and had an electronically limited top speed of 155 mph (250 km/h), although with the limiters removed top speed was estimated at 186 mph (299 km/h). Worldwide production ceased May 12, 1999, with 30,621 built.

BMW is rumored to have plans to revive the 8 Series name for a potential “four-door coupe,” much like the Mercedes-Benz CLS-Class. The existing E63/E64 6-Series two-door coupe currently competes with the CLS-Class in that price point.

Design of the 8 Series began in 1984, with construction starting in 1986. The 8 Series debuted at the Frankfurt Motor Show (IAA) in early September 1991. The 8 Series was designed to move beyond the market of the original 6 Series. The 8 and 6 Series cars were distinctly different in design; though both were Supercar cars, the 8 Series had substantially improved performance, as well as a far higher purchase price.

Over 1.5 billion Deutschmark was spent on total development (2008 USD nearly $1 billion). BMW used CAD tools, still unusual at the time, to design the car’s all-new body. Combined with wind tunnel testing, the resulting car had a drag coefficient of 0.29, a major improvement from the previous BMW M6/635CSi’s 0.39.