Audi Q7 2009 Detail Specification Video Reviews


From $43,500
Athletic handling on air-suspension-equipped models, high-tech luxury and safety features, superior interior design and craftsmanship, available diesel model.

Heavy curb weight hampers acceleration and fuel economy, cramped third-row seat, no factory rear-seat entertainment system.

For 2009, Audi debuts the diesel-powered Q7 TDI, which will be available later in the year. Other Q7 models are unchanged, save for some feature and trim level updates: The base 3.6 gets a standard premium sound system, a trip computer, telescoping sun visors and satellite radio. Also, Audi’s MMI control interface is now optional on that model. Standard front parking sensors are dropped from the midlevel Premium trim. Q7s with the 4.2-liter V8 engine receive a cleaner ULEV tailpipe emission rating and see a slight improvement in fuel economy. The Prestige trim on the 4.2 model gets voice recognition and a blind-spot warning system.

Read more detail and view video clip reviews

Now in its third year, the Audi Q7 offers everything you’d expect from a German-engineered large crossover SUV: high-end accoutrements, sporty handling and the ability to transport kids and cargo with relative ease. This distant relative of the Volkswagen Touareg and Porsche Cayenne is more than a foot longer than the others, and as such, offers more space to accommodate cargo and a third row of seats. With this added size, the Audi is even heavier than its brethren, and this has taken its toll on both acceleration and fuel consumption in the past.

Audi has come up with a partial answer to these dilemmas for 2009 with a new TDI model, which is scheduled to arrive in dealerships shortly after its gasoline-powered counterparts. The 3.0-liter clean-burning diesel engine is 50-state legal. It’s rated at a modest 221 horsepower, but as is typical of diesel power plants, makes a healthy amount of torque — 369 pound-feet. The advantages of the TDI Q7 include not only improved overall fuel economy, but increased range, which in turn reduces the number of trips to the pump.

Still, the 2009 Audi Q7 has faults. In addition to mediocre acceleration and fuel economy in models with gasoline engines, the Q7 suffers from a rather cramped third-row seat. Saving graces include a well-crafted interior, agile handling and a collection of luxury features that make the Q7 ideal for daily family use and long-distance drives. But we also suggest taking a look at the Mercedes-Benz GL-Class, which offers more room and more than ample performance. Also, the Cadillac Escalade, while not a unibody crossover, provides class-leading passenger and cargo space. A new hybrid version of that SUV, which boasts 20-mpg-combined fuel economy, is a good competitor to the Q7 TDI.

For Pricing information, see our Pricing page.