Acura Tsx 2009 Detail Specification Video Reviews


From $29,160
Immense features list, spacious interior, highly advanced technology features, sporty handling, well-built with nice materials.

Four-cylinder engine could use more low-end power, button-happy center console, lacks a certain premium feel.

The Acura TSX is completely redesigned for 2009. Major changes include a larger size for enhanced interior room, revised exterior styling and new technology-oriented features.

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“The last one was better.”

For some reason, car enthusiasts love throwing this out when it comes to a redesigned model. It’s an unusual (and often faulty) way of showing off supposed automotive acumen; an offshoot of the “they don’t build ’em like they used to” attitude. Having said that, the 2009 Acura TSX may not be worse than its predecessor, but we’re not sure it’s improved.

The TSX basics remain. Acura’s entry-level model is a front-wheel-drive sedan with a high-revving four-cylinder engine, taut handling, a spacious cabin and class-leading feature content. Some thought Acura would use the turbocharged engine from its RDX, a small SUV, this time around, but instead it chose to just slightly revise the normally aspirated 2.4-liter inline-4 to produce a bit more low- and midrange power — a decision that could prove to be a potential liability. With 201 horsepower and 170 pound-feet of torque, output is certainly adequate and now more useful in everyday driving, but shoppers keen on spicy acceleration will find more to like from turbocharged or V6-powered competitors. Given that the fuel economy is also only a hair better than the related (and heavier) Honda Accord’s 268-hp V6, it seems Acura missed the opportunity to get a jump on competitor vehicles that provide similar power and fuel economy to the TSX.

There are a few areas where the TSX has gone backwards. The new electric steering isn’t as communicative as the old hydraulic system. Styling, while subjective, is not as streamlined as the original “flying wedge” design — the new TSX has bulges and creases and a chrome grille mustache, all of which try too hard to mask an otherwise mundane sedan. Inside, the TSX’s previous touchscreen electronics interface (good) has been replaced with a multipurpose knob with a multitude of buttons (bad). Thankfully, the intuitive voice commands remain.